What 3-4 months means…

Maureen MinchinAllergies, Bottle Feeding, breastmilk, Child Health, Commentary, Complementary Feeding, Food Intolerance, General News, Immunology, Infant Formula, Infant Health, Maternal Health, Milk Matters, Weaning

There should be no recommendation for change to the age of introduction of other foods to breastfed infants. For formula fed infants, there may be a case for widening the diet from 3-4 months onwards, as total dependence on a single dehydrated industrial powder is inherently risky; moderation and variety are the keys to dietary safety. Infant body stores are … Read More

Milk Fats and Fantasies: MFGMs

Maureen MinchinAllergies, Bottle Feeding, breastmilk, Child Health, General News, Infant Formula, Infant Health, Lactation, Microbiome, Milk Matters

In some ways formula has come full circle. The 1980s banishing of “animal fats” is now seen by some scientists as a mistake. Companies are likely to reintroduce processed milk fat in formulas where it presently does not exist.  Of course bovine and human milk fats are not identical[ii], as calves have different needs from babies. As they have for … Read More

LEAPing to conclusions: when to introduce foods

Maureen MinchinGeneral News

LEAPing to conclusions about timing of widening the diet. Background Any society’s most common food allergens reflect both the immunological characteristics of the foods, and the cultural use of those foods. The most common western allergens are cows’ milk, egg, peanuts, and wheat, with cows’ milk protein allergy/hypersensitivity negatively affecting (and indeed killing) more children than either egg or peanut … Read More

Research shows what parents have known for decades

Maureen MinchinAllergies, Child Health, General News, Immunology, Infant Health, Pregnancy

OK, here’s what’s been in the news. http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/321/321ra8 “Now, Zhang et al. report that infants who later developed food allergy had altered immunity at birth. Cord blood from these infants had more monocytes compared with CD4+ T cells and decreased numbers of regulatory T cells. Moreover, the monocytes from food-allergic infants secreted more inflammatory cytokines than those from healthy infants. These … Read More